Globalization of Sport Economy

শেয়ার করুণ

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The globalization of sport is inextricably connected with people, technology, media, ideology and economic flow. Sportsmen across the globe is moving to participate in different sport events followed by a large number of sport tourists, media is broadcasting for worldwide audience, transferring of machineries and equipment are taking place however, it is the flow of money that displays the most versatile role. Sport economy, according to Sport Economist W. Andreff is increasing nearly at the same pace as GDP in most of the countries. 

Experts explicitly mark underdevelopment of sport economy in non-core or developing countries; shortage of coach, sport health care, budget constraints being the underpinning reasons for that. Consequently, developing countries are being deprived of the opportunity to participate actively in the global sport economy. These nations also get lesser privilege hence, in most of the cases they do not even qualify to become global sport organizers resulting deprivation from both prestige and economic benefits. Illustrated by Nauright in his article is the deprivation of rights of aboriginal communities in decision making in Sydney Olympic Committee in 1993 is rather a depiction of the social inequality existing in the society at large resulting uneven development of sport economy in non-core countries than developed countries. 

Sport in a global scale reinforces national-esteem which involves a formation of patriotic game in which stories and images are formed about own and other nation states. Many consider globalization of sport as a threat to child-labor, illegal migration and economic injustice towards non-core countries. Conversely, South Africa’s national rugby team selects a song for their promotion and the song was originally sung by migrant black workers. Interestingly enough, this song helped South Africans to forget racial divisions temporarily and to achieve final victory in the tournament. Yet, there had been heavy criticism by intellectual society of South Africa for RWC being a portrayal of more American hype than of South African reality. While many question whether through globalization national identity is strengthening or weakening, no definite answer has been found yet.   

In conclusion, globalization of sport economy is a potential tool for developing countries to improve however, it is the developed countries that trick and maintain the unequal power relationship. 

The writer is an Editor of the English Section at Narayanganj Bulletin and a Post-Grad Student at Jahangirnagar University

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